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1.2 The Lorelais' First Day at Chilton

Updated: Sep 11, 2021

Air date: October 12, 2000

Times the word "coffee" mentioned: 7


LITERATURE LOCATIONS FILM MUSIC POP CULTURE QUOTES VOCABULARY

jump to: glossary index categoriesindex a - z


EPISODE RUN-THROUGH


--- XTC, Apple Venus Volume 2

- XTC

--- I'm the Man Who Murdered Love by XTC

--- Do you know what happens to people when they're late on their first day? It's shorter?

--- Rodeo

--- I Don't Know How to Say Goodbye to You by Sam Phillips

--- Off with their heads

- Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

--- I'm just trying to see if there's a hunchback up in that belltower

- The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo

- The Hunchback of Notre Dame

--- That chick from Dukes of Hazzard

- Dukes of Hazzard

--- You ready? No. You ready? Yes.

--- Symphony fundraising committee

--- Well there's nothing like friends. Especially if they're old... ones

--- Overzealous

--- 4.0 grade average

--- Honda

--- Schindler's List

--- Journalism

--- Political science

--- Christiane Amanpour

--- Cokie Roberts

--- Oprah

--- Rosie

--- The View

--- Lobster puffs

--- Failure is a part of life, but not a part of Chilton

--- Dixie chick

--- I hate nature

- The Goonies

--- Big sister

--- The curve

--- Bulimia

--- Pregnancy

--- This is not an herbal tea morning. This is a coffee morning. Every morning for you is a coffee morning. This is a jumbo coffee morning. I need coffee in an IV. I can give you tea and a Balance Bar.

- I.V.

- Balance Bar

--- Sadist

--- Fiend

--- My clothes were at the cleaners, and I had the fuzzy clock and it didn't purr on time. It didn't purr? It's fuzzy. It purrs.

--- Stars and Stripes Forever by John Philip Sousa

--- Thanksgiving Parade

--- Fifth Avenue

--- Brazil

--- But there are five days in a school week. Really? Are you sure? Because my days of the week underwear only go to Thursday

--- Well, then we'll use this newfangled thing called a washing machine. The town just chipped in and bought one. My turn's Tuesday.

- Newfangled

--- Russia

--- Charles Dickens

--- Fyodor Dostoevsky

--- George Sand

--- Honoré de Balzac

--- War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

--- Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

--- David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

--- Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

--- A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

--- Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens

--- Leo Tolstoy (Count Leo)

--- A Mary

--- Daunting

--- The Franklin, the school paper. Are you going out for it? I don't know, I have to find my locker first.

--- Valedictorian

--- This school is my domain and the Franklin is my domain. And don't you ever forget that.

- Domain

--- Quarters

--- Oh, excuse me sir. Can you tell me where we can find the best antiques? At your house, I'd guess.

--- Panasonic

--- I kind of view studying as a solitary activity, but thanks.

--- New York

--- P.T.A.

--- China

--- Rome

--- Harry Potter

- Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling

- Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire

--- Mr. Personality of the New Millennium

--- Hectic

--- Bizarro

--- They kicked the gnome. What? Right in the head. That's just not cool. I'm very sorry. Is the gnome okay? Oh, he's fine sugar, thanks for asking. But I wouldn't trust these boys. Gnome kicking says a lot about a man's character.

- Gnome

--- DSL

--- Nothing Shakespeare couldn't turn into a really good play.

- William Shakespeare

--- Romanists

--- Adroitness

--- Christendom

--- Martin Luther

--- Christian nobility

- To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation by Martin Luther

--- Well, we like our internet slow, okay? We can turn it on, walk around, do a little dance, make a sandwich. With DSL, there's no dancing, no walking, and we'd starve.

--- The Shining

- The Shining by Stephen King

--- Triple caps, easy foam

--- Tweedy

--- Virgin Mary

--- Goody-goody

--- Slut

--- Mary Magdalene

--- Wow, biblical insults. This is an advanced school.

--- What if Lane comes along, and you guys can shop and study and join a cult and shave your heads?

- Cult

--- Lane, your mother is gonna kill me if I keep sending you home fed and happy

--- Tofu

--- Yeah, angry chicks are the worst. When I was in high school, I had a Paris. Yeah? Yeah, she was horrible. How'd you get rid of her? I got pregnant and dropped out. What if I just learn to French-braid her hair? Even better.

- French braid

--- A big guy named Moose


 

GLOSSARY

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4.0 GRADE AVERAGE – means that Rory’s average overall letter grade in school is an A, and her overall grade as a percentage is over 90%. In other words, she’s a straight A student.

A BIG GUY NAMED MOOSE – Marmaduke “Moose” Mason is a character in the Archie comics. Large, muscular, and athletic, the loyal Moose often protects his friends from bullies.

A MARY – refers to the Virgin Mary, meaning that she looks like a good girl, a virgin.

A TALE OF TWO CITIES BY CHARLES DICKENS – an 1859 historical novel by Charles Dickens, set in London and Paris before and during the French Revolution.

ADROITNESS – noun; cleverness or skill, expertise.

ALICE’S ADVENTURES IN WONDERLAND BY LEWIS CARROLL – an 1865 novel by English author Lewis Carroll. It tells of a young girl named Alice, who falls through a rabbit hole into a subterranean fantasy world populated by peculiar, anthropomorphic creatures. It is considered to be one of the best examples of the literary nonsense genre.

ANNA KARENINA BY LEO TOLSTOY – a novel by the Russian author Leo Tolstoy, first published in book form in 1878. Many writers consider Anna Karenina the greatest work of literature ever and Tolstoy himself called it his first true novel.

BALANCE BAR – brand name of a nutritional energy bar, first released in 1992, and adhering to the principles of the Zone Diet expounded by Dr. Barry Sears. It is based on the 40-30-30 dietary principle, that is, a diet containing 40% carbohydrate, 30% protein, and 30% dietary fat. In 2000, the company was bought by Kraft Foods.

BIG SISTER – a possible allusion to Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, an organization where children are matched with an older mentor to encourage them both educationally and socially.

BIZARRO – a fictional supervillain appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The character was created by writer Otto Binder and artist George Papp as a “mirror image” of Superman and first appeared in "Superboy #68."

BRAZIL – officially the Federative Republic of Brazil, is the largest country in both South America and Latin America. At 8.5 million square kilometers with over 211 million people, Brazil is the world’s fifth-largest country by area and the sixth most populous.

BULIMIA – a serious eating disorder marked by binging, followed by methods to avoid weight gain. It is a potentially life-threatening eating disorder. People with this condition binge eat. They then take steps to avoid weight gain. Most commonly, this means vomiting (purging). But it can also mean excessive exercising or fasting. Treatments include counseling, medications, and nutrition education.

BUT THERE ARE FIVE DAYS IN A SCHOOL WEEK. REALLY? ARE YOU SURE? BECAUSE MY DAYS OF THE WEEK UNDERWEAR ONLY GO TO THURSDAY – Lorelai is sarcastically joking that she only thought there were four days in the school week because her days of the week underwear only go from Monday to Thursday.

CHARLES DICKENS – Charles John Huffam Dickens FRSA was an English writer and social critic. He created some of the world’s best-known fictional characters and is regarded by many as the greatest novelist of the Victorian era. He is said to be Tolstoy’s favorite author.

CHINA – officially the People’s Republic of China, is a country in East Asia. It is the world’s most populous country, with a population of around 1.4 billion in 2019. Covering approximately 9.6 million square kilometers, it is the world’s third or fourth-largest country by area.

CHRISTENDOM – the worldwide body or society of Christians; the Christian world.

CHRISTIAN NOBILITY – refers to Martin Luther’s To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation written in 1520 which advocated for a break away from the Catholic church.

CHRISTIANE AMANPOUR – Christiane Maria Heideh Amanpour CBE is a British-Iranian journalist and television host. Amanpour is the Chief International Anchor for CNN and host of CNN International’s nightly interview program Amanpour. She is also the host of Amanpour & Company on PBS.

COKIE ROBERTS – Mary Martha Corinne Morrison Claiborne “Cokie” Roberts was a multi-award-winning American journalist and bestselling author. Her career included decades as a political reporter and senior news analyst for National Public Radio and ABC News, with prominent positions on Morning Edition, The MacNeil / Lehrer NewsHour, World News Tonight, and This Week.

CULT – noun; a particular system of religious worship, especially with reference to its rites and ceremonies.

DAUNTING – adjective; seeming difficult to deal with in anticipation; intimidating.

DAVID COPPERFIELD BY CHARLES DICKENS – the eighth novel by Charles Dickens. The novel’s full title is The Personal History, Adventures, Experience and Observation of David Copperfield the Younger of Blunderstone Rookery. It was first published as a serial in 1849-50, and as a book in 1850. It was considered to be Tolstoy and Dickens favorite of his novels, being heavily based on Charles Dickens’ life.

DIXIE CHICK – The Dixie Chicks are a country music band from Texas consisting of sisters Martie Maguire, Emily Robison, and Natalie Maines. Their first album was released in 1990, and they achieved commercial success with Wide Open Spaces in 1998, when they sold more CDs than all other country music groups combined.

DOMAIN – an area of territory owned or controlled by a ruler or government.

DSL – stands for Digital Subscriber Line, is a family of technologies that are used to transmit digital data over telephone lines. In telecommunications marketing, the term DSL is widely understood to mean asymmetric digital subscriber line, the most commonly installed DSL technology, for internet access.

DUKES OF HAZZARD – an American action-comedy television series that was aired on CBS from January 26, 1979 to February 8, 1985. The show aired for 147 episodes spanning seven seasons. It was consistently among the top-rated television series in the late 1970s. The show is about two young male cousins, Bo and Luke Duke, who live in rural Georgia and are on probation for moonshine running. The young men and their friends and their female cousin Daisy Duke have various escapades as they evade the corrupt law officers.

FIEND – noun; an evil spirit or demon; a wicked or cruel person.

FIFTH AVENUE – a major thoroughfare in the borough of Manhattan in New York City. It stretches north from Washington Square Park in Greenwich Village to West 143rd Street in Harlem. It is considered one of the most expensive and elegant streets in the world.

FRENCH BRAID – a plait of hair which begins from the crown of the head, making a more elaborate braid with a sophisticated look. The French themselves identify the braid as African in origin, as the style is earliest known in North Africa.

FYODOR DOSTOEVSKY – Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky, sometimes transliterated Dostoyevsky, was a Russian novelist, philosopher, short story writer, essayist, and journalist.

GEORGE SAND – Amantine Lucile Aurore Dupin, best known by her pen name George Sand, was a French novelist, memoirist, and Socialist.

GNOME – a mythological creature and diminutive spirit in Renaissance magic and alchemy, first introduced by Paracelsus in the 16th century and later adopted by more recent authors including those of modern fantasy literature. It is often a small garden ornament in the form of a bearded man with a pointed hat.

GOODY-GOODY – noun; a person who is self-righteously, affectedly, or cloyingly good.

GREAT EXPECTATIONS BY CHARLES DICKENS – the thirteenth novel by Charles Dickens and his penultimate completed novel, which depicts the education of an orphan nicknamed Pip. It is Dickens’ second novel, after David Copperfield, to be fully narrated in the first person.

HARRY POTTER – is a series of seven fantasy novels written by British author J.K. Rowling. The novels chronicle the lives of a young wizard, Harry Potter, and his friends Hermione Granger and Ron Weasley, all of whom are students at Hogwarts School of Witchcraft and Wizardry.

HARRY POTTER AND THE GOBLET OF FIRE BY J.K. ROWLING – a fantasy book written by British author J.K. Rowling and the fourth novel in the Harry Potter series.

HECTIC – adjective; characterized by activity, excitement, or confusion.

HONDA – a Japanese public multinational conglomerate corporation primarily known as a manufacturer of automobiles, motorcycles, and power equipment. Hondas are well-known for being cheap to run and with low repair costs. Given how expensive Rory’s school is, Rory’s “running costs” are not really that low.

HONORÉ DE BALZAC – a French novelist and playwright whose works were beloved by Dostoevsky. One of the founders of literary realism in Europe, Balzac is most famous for La Comédie humaine (“The Human Comedy”), a series of more than 90 interlinked novels, stories, and essays depicting French society in the 19th century. It presents a panorama of post-Napoleonic French life. It is generally viewed as his magnum opus.

I DON’T KNOW HOW TO SAY GOODBYE TO YOU BY SAM PHILLIPS – played while Lorelai and Rory drive through Stars Hollow on their way to Chilton. This song is from Sam Phillips’ 1988 album The Indescribable Wow, which was her first album after switching from Christian pop to mainstream alternative rock, and changing her name from Leslie to Sam. The album was well-received by critics but did not chart.

I HATE NATURE – in the film The Goonies, the character of Chunk (Jeff Cohen) says as he runs alone to find help at night: “I like the dark, I love the dark. But I hate nature. I hate nature!”


I.V. – stands for intravenous therapy which is a therapy that delivers fluids directly into a vein. The intravenous route of administration can be used both for injections, using a syringe at higher pressures, as well as for infusions, typically using only the pressure supplied by gravity. IV therapy is the delivery of fluids, blood, or medication directly into a patient’s system through the veins.


I’M JUST TRYING TO SEE IF THERE’S A HUNCHBACK UP IN THAT BELL TOWER – alluding to The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, a Gothic novel by French author Victor Hugo which was first published in 1831. Set in the Middle Ages, the protagonist of the novel is Quasimodo, a hunchback who is the bell-ringer in the cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris. It has several times been adapted to film. The most recent for Lorelai and Rory in 2000 would be the 1996 animated Disney version.

I’M THE MAN WHO MURDERED LOVE BY XTC – the sixth track on the album Apple Venus Volume 2 by the English band XTC. It is the only single XTC released from it.

JOURNALISM – noun; the activity or profession of writing for newspapers, magazines, or news websites or preparing news to be broadcast. Of note, Harvard doesn’t have an undergraduate degree in Journalism, but Rory might have been planning to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Social Studies, focusing on Government, and then getting a Master of Liberal Arts in Journalism.

LEO TOLSTOY (COUNT LEO) – Count Lev Nikolayevich Tolstoy, usually referred to in English as Leo Tolstoy, was a Russian writer who is regarded as one of the greatest authors of all time. Best known for his novels War and Peace (1869) and Anna Karenina (1877), both seen as eminent examples of realist fiction.

LITTLE DORRIT BY CHARLES DICKENS – a novel by Charles Dickens, originally published in serial form between 1855 and 1857. The story features Amy Dorrit, youngest child of her family, born and raised in the Marshalsea prison for debtors in London.

LOBSTER PUFFS – an appetizer of creamy lobster filling inside a choux pastry shell (like a cream puff with lobster inside instead of custard). It has a particular connection to the New England region where Gilmore Girls is set.

MARTIN LUTHER – was a German professor of theology, composer, priest, Augustinian monk, and a seminal figure in the Reformation. Luther was ordained to the priesthood in 1507. He came to reject several teachings and practices of the Roman Catholic Church; in particular, he disputed the view on indulgences.

MARY MAGDALENE – sometimes called Mary of Magdala, or simply the Magdalene or the Madeleine, was a Jewish woman who, according to the four canonical gospels, traveled with Jesus as one of his followers and was a witness to his crucifixion and its aftermath. The Gospels tell us that before she became his follower, Mary Magdalene was healed by Jesus, who drove seven demons out of her. In medieval Christianity, she was portrayed as a repentant prostitute, although this is not supported by the Bible.


NEW YORK – comprises 5 boroughs sitting where the Hudson River meets the Atlantic Ocean. At its core is Manhattan, a densely populated borough that’s among the world’s major commercial, financial and cultural centers. Its iconic sites include skyscrapers such as the Empire State Building and sprawling Central Park. Broadway theater is staged in neon-lit Times Square.


NEWFANGLED – adjective; different from what one is used to; objectionably new.

NOTHING SHAKESPEARE COULDN’T TURN INTO A REALLY GOOD PLAY – Lorelai is probably thinking of those tragedies by William Shakespeare which rely on family conflict, such as King Lear or Romeo and Juliet.

OFF WITH THEIR HEADS – a quote from The Queen of Hearts, a character in Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, whose furious catchphrase demands immediate death sentences on the flimsiest pretexts. This nonsensical fantasy novel was written by English author Lewis Carroll (the pen name of Charles Dodgson) and published in 1865. An immediate publishing sensation, it has gone on to become a classic enjoyed by both children and adults. It has been adapted into other media numerous times: as a child, Rory may have seen the 1951 Disney movie Alice in Wonderland, which was re-released on video in 1991 when she was seven – the same age as Alice in the book. The book begins with a white rabbit looking at his watch and worrying that he is running late, just as Lorelai and Rory began the day behind schedule. The book plays with the concept of time and dates, much as Gilmore Girls does.

OPRAH – Oprah Gail Winfrey in an American talk show host, television producer, actress, author, and philanthropist. She is best known for her talk show, The Oprah Winfrey Show, which ran from 1986 to 2011, broadcast from Chicago, which was the highest-rated talk show in history.

OVERZEALOUS – adjective; too enthusiastic and eager.


P.T.A. – the Parent-Teacher Association, an organization of parents and staff which promotes parental involvement in the school.

PANASONIC – Panasonic Corporation, formerly known as the Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd., founded in 1918 as a lightbulb socket manufacturer, is a major Japanese multinational electronics company, headquartered in Kadoma, Osaka. The harpist Drella is saying that she’s not a stereo whose music can be turned up and down at someone’s whim.

POLITICAL SCIENCE – noun; the branch of knowledge that deals with systems of government; the analysis of political activity and behavior. Of note, Harvard doesn’t have an undergraduate degree in Political Science, but Rory might have been planning to obtain a Bachelor of Arts in Social Studies, focusing on Government, and then getting a Master of Liberal Arts in Journalism.

PREGNANCY – the term used to describe the period of which a fetus develops inside a woman’s womb or uterus. It usually lasts about 40 weeks, or just over 9 months, as measured from the last menstrual period to delivery.

QUARTERS – a drinking game where people toss quarters (25 cent coins) so that they land in a particular place, usually a glass.

RODEO – a competitive sporting event based on cattle herding, testing skills in horse riding and handling livestock. The word rodeo (Spanish for “round up”) comes from Latin America and was adopted by North American cowboys in the 19th century. Rodeos are particularly popular in the American west, as well as in Canada, Mexico, Australia and New Zealand.

ROMANISTS – those during the time of Romanism, which is a derogatory term for Roman Catholicism used when anti-Catholicism was more common in the United States and the United Kingdom. The term was frequently used in late-nineteenth and early-twentieth century Republican invectives against the Democrats, as part of the slogan “Rum, Romanism, and Rebellion.”

ROME – is the capital city and a special commune of Italy as well as the capital of the Lazio region. The city has been a major human settlement for almost three millennia. With 2,860,009 residents, it is also the country’s most populated commune.

ROSIE – born in 1962, Roseann O’Donnell, known as Rosie O’Donnell, is an American comedian, producer, actress, author and television personality. She began her comedy career as a teenager and received her breakthrough on the television series Star Search in 1984. Her talk show, The Rosie O’Donnell Show, ran from 1996 to 2002 and won multiple Emmy Awards. During the show’s run she became known for her light-hearted banter with celebrity guests, and for her promotion of Broadway musicals.

RUSSIA – or the Russian Federation, is a transcontinental country located in Eastern Europe and Northern Asia.

SADIST – a person who takes pleasure in inflicting pain, punishment, or humiliation on others.

SCHINDLER’S LIST – a 1993 American epic historical drama film directed and produced by Steven Spielberg and written by Steven Zaillian. It is based on the 1982 non-fiction novel Schindler’s Ark by Australian novelist Thomas Keneally. Based on real life events, it tells the story of Oskar Schindler, a German Nazi Party member who unexpectedly became a World War II hero after saving hundreds of Jews from Auschwitz.

SLUT – a careless, dirty, slovenly woman.

STARS AND STRIPES FOREVER BY JOHN PHILIP SOUSA – plays while Miss Patty teaches baton twirling to a class of little girls. Sousa wrote this song in 1896 and it was first performed in 1897 to immediate enthusiasm. Generally considered Sousa’s masterwork, it is the official National March of the United States and is usually played for the U.S. President after he or she finishes a speech. It also has a special meaning in show business, especially the theatre and circus, where it is known as “The Disaster March.” Traditionally, it is used to signal that there is a life-threatening emergency so that staff can handle exit without causing panic. One notable use of it in this context was at a circus fire in Hartford in 1944, where at least 60 people were killed. Its use in the show at this point may be meant to signify what a disaster of a day Lorelai was having.

SYMPHONY FUNDRAISING COMMITTEE – the Hartford Symphony Orchestra is one of America’s leading regional orchestras, performing more than 200 times each year. It raises funds through subscriptions and donations, and by hosting special events.

THANKSGIVING PARADE – the annual Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade in New York City, the world’s largest parade, is presented by the U.S. based department store chain Macy’s. The parade started in 1924, tying it for the second-oldest Thanksgiving parade in the United States with America’s Thanksgiving Parade in Detroit. Teams of baton twirlers are a common feature of the parade.

THAT CHICK FROM THE DUKES OF HAZZARD – Lorelai is referring to Daisy Duke, a character played by Catherine Bach in the action-comedy television series, The Dukes of Hazzard (1979-1985). Daisy often wore cut-off denim shorts, which have become known as “Daisy Dukes.”

THE CURVE – some schools grade on a curve, meaning that the performance of the group overall is taken into account when assigning grades. In its most extreme form, grades are assigned based on a student’s rank in class, placing students in direct competition with each other. Chilton obviously grades on a curve, fostering a highly competitive environment. Paris is concerned that Rory joining the class, with her excellent academic results, may affect her own grades.

THE GOONIES – a 1985 American adventure comedy film co-produced and directed by Richard Donner from a screenplay by Chris Columbus, based on a story by executive producer Steven Spielberg. In the film, a group of children try to save their homes from demolition as they search for pirate treasure. The Goonies was the #9 film of 1985 and has become a cult classic.

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME – a 1996 American animated musical drama film produced by Walt Disney Feature Animation for Walt Disney Pictures. Based off of the 1831 Gothic novel written by French author Victor Hugo.

THE HUNCHBACK OF NOTRE DAME BY VICTOR HUGO – a Gothic novel by French author Victor Hugo which was first published in 1831. Set in the Middle Ages, the protagonist of the novel is Quasimodo, a hunchback who is the bell-ringer in the cathedral of Notre-Dame in Paris. It has several times been adapted to film. The most recent for Lorelai and Rory in 2000 would be the 1996 animated Disney version. It is ironic that it is Quasimodo’s job to mark the time of day by ringing the bells in the cathedral when Lorelai’s clock did not go off.

THE SHINING – a 1980 psychological horror film produced and directed by Stanley Kubrick and co-written with novelist Diane Johnson. The film is based on Stephen King’s 1977 novel of the same name and stars Jack Nicholson, Shelley Duvall, Scatman Crothers, and Danny Lloyd.

THE SHINING BY STEPHEN KING – a horror novel by American author Stephen King. Published in 1977, it is King’s third published novel and first hardback bestseller. The success of the book firmly established King as a preeminent author in the horror genre.

THE VIEW – an American morning talk show, broadcast since 1997. Its panel of female co-hosts discuss a range of political, social, and pop cultural topics, followed by celebrity interviews. It has won a number of Daytime Emmy Awards. In 2000, panelists on The View were Barbara Walters, Joy Behar, Meredith Vieira, Star Jones, and Lisa Ling.

TO THE CHRISTIAN NOBILITY OF THE GERMAN NATION BY MARTIN LUTHER – the first of three tracts written by Martin Luther in 1520. In this work, he defined for the first time the signature doctrines of the priesthood of all believers and the two kingdoms. The work was written in the vernacular language German and not in Latin.

TOFU – also known as bean curd, is a food prepared by coagulating soy milk and then pressing the resulting curds into solid white blocks of varying softness; it can be silken, soft, firm, or extra firm. Beyond these broad categories, there are many varieties of tofu.

TRIPLE CAPS, EASY FOAM – Lorelai has bought herself and Rory two cappuccinos made with three shots of espresso (triple strength), lightly foamed on top.

TWEEDY – adjective; accustomed to, preferring, or characterized by the wearing of tweeds (a coarse wool cloth in a variety of weaves and colors, either hand-spun and handwoven in Scotland or reproduced, often by machine, elsewhere), as in genteel country life or academia.

VALEDICTORIAN – noun; the student usually having the highest rank in a graduating class who delivers the valedictory address at the commencement exercises.

VIRGIN MARY – Mary was a first-century Galilean Jewish woman of Nazareth, the wife of Joseph, and the mother of Jesus, according to the canonical gospels and the Quran. The gospels of Matthew and Luke in the New Testament and the Quran describe Mary as a virgin. In Matthew and Luke, she is betrothed to Joseph. Lorelai explains to Rory that Tristan called her Mary because of the Virgin Mary, meaning that she looks like a good girl, a virgin.

WAR AND PEACE BY LEO TOLSTOY – a novel by the Russian author Leo Tolstoy, first published serially, then published in its entirety in 1869. It is regarded as one of Tolstoy’s finest literary achievements and remains a classic of world literature.

WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE – was an English playwright, poet, and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world’s greatest dramatist. He is often called England’s national poet and the “Bard of Avon.”

XTC – were an English rock band formed in Sweden in 1972. Fronted by songwriters Andy Partridge and Colin Moulding, the band gained popularity during the rise of punk and new wave in the 1970s, later playing in a variety of styles that ranged from angular guitar riffs to elaborately arranged pop.

XTC, APPLE VENUS VOLUME 2 – also known as Wasp Star, is the 14th and most recent studio album by the English rock band XTC, released on Cooking Vinyl / Idea Records on May 23, 2000. It is the follow-up to 1999s Apple Venus Volume 1 and contains rock-based material largely written between 1994 and 1996.


 

INDEX BY CATEGORY

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LITERATURE

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling

Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens

The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo

The Shining by Stephen King

To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation by Martin Luther

War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy


LOCATIONS

Brazil

China

Fifth Avenue

New York

Rome

Russia


FILM

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire (2005)

Schindler’s List (1993)

The Dukes of Hazzard (1979 - 1985)

The Goonies (1985)

The Hunchback of Notre Dame (1996)

The Shining (1980)


MUSIC

I Don’t Know How to Say Goodbye to You by Sam Phillips

I’m the Man Who Murdered Love by XTC

Stars and Stripes Forever by John Philip Sousa

XTC, Apple Venus Volume 2


POP CULTURE

A big guy named Moose

A Mary

Bizarro

Charles Dickens

Christiane Amanpour

Cokie Roberts

Fyodor Dostoevsky

George Sand

Harry Potter

Honda

Honoré de Balzac

Leo Tolstoy (Count Leo)

Martin Luther

Mary Magdalene

Off with their heads

Oprah

Quarters

Romanists

Rosie

That chick from the Dukes of Hazzard

Thanksgiving Parade

The View

Virgin Mary

William Shakespeare

XTC


QUOTES

“But there are five days in a school week.” “Really? Are you sure? Because my days of the week underwear only go to Thursday.” – Emily & Lorelai

“Do you know what happens to people when they’re late?” “It’s shorter?” – Rory & Lorelai

“Failure is a part of life, but not a part of Chilton.” – Headmaster Charleston

“I hate nature.” – Madeline

“I kind of view studying as a solitary activity, but thanks.” – Rory

“I’m just trying to see if there’s a hunchback up in that bell tower.” – Lorelai

“Lane, your mother is gonna kill me if I keep sending you home fed and happy.” – Lorelai

“Mr. Personality of the new millennium.” – Lorelai

“My clothes were at the cleaners, and I had the fuzzy clock and it didn’t purr on time.” “It didn’t purr?” “It’s fuzzy. It purrs.” – Lorelai & Luke

“Nothing Shakespeare couldn’t turn into a really good play.” – Lorelai

“Oh, excuse me sir. Can you tell me where we can find the best antiques? At your house, I’d guess.” – Customer & Michel

“The Franklin. The school paper. Are you going out for it?” “I don’t know, I have to find my locker first.” – Paris & Rory

“They kicked the gnome.” “What?” “Right in the head.” “That’s just not cool.” “I’m very sorry. Is the gnome okay?” “Oh, he’s fine sugar, thanks for asking. But I wouldn’t trust these boys. Gnome kicking says a lot about a man’s character.” – Babette, Lorelai, & Morey

“This is not an herbal tea morning. This is a coffee morning.” “Every morning for you is a coffee morning.” “This is a jumbo coffee morning. I need coffee in an IV.” “I can give you tea and a Balance bar.” – Lorelai & Luke

“This school is my domain and the Franklin is my domain. And don’t you ever forget that.” – Paris

“Well, then we’ll use this newfangled thing called a washing machine. The town just chipped in and bought one. My turn’s Tuesday.” – Lorelai

“Well, there’s nothing like friends. Especially if they’re old… ones.” – Lorelai

“Well, we like our internet slow, okay? We can turn it on, walk around, do a little dance, make a sandwich. With DSL, there’s no dancing, no walking, and we’d starve.” – Lorelai

“What if Lane comes along, and you guys can shop and study and join a cult and shave your heads?” – Lorelai

“Wow, biblical insults. This is an advanced school.” – Rory

“Yeah, angry chicks are the worst. When I was in high school, I had a Paris.” “Yeah?” “Yeah, she was horrible.” “How’d you get rid of her?” “I got pregnant and dropped out.” “What if I just learn to French-braid her hair?” “Even better.” – Lorelai & Rory

“You ready?” “No.” “You ready?” “Yes.” – Lorelai & Rory

VOCABULARY

4.0 grade average

Adroitness

Balance bar

Big sister

Bulimia

Christendom

Christian nobility

Cult

Daunting

Dixie chick

Domain

DSL

Fiend

French braid

Goody-goody

Gnome

Hectic

I.V

Journalism

Lobster puffs

Newfangled

Overzealous

Panasonic

Political science

Pregnancy

P.T.A

Rodeo

Sadist

Slut

Symphony fundraising committee

The curve

Tofu

Triple caps, easy foam

Tweedy

Valedictorian


 

INDEX A - Z

[ back to top ]

4.0 grade average

A big guy named Moose

A Mary

A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

Adroitness

Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy

Balance bar

Big sister

Bizarro

Brazil

Bulimia

Charles Dickens

China

Christendom

Christian nobility

Christiane Amanpour

Cokie Roberts

Cult

Daunting

David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

Dixie chick

Domain

DSL

Dukes of Hazzard

Fiend

Fifth Avenue

French braid

Fyodor Dostoevsky

George Sand

Gnome

Goody-goody

Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Harry Potter

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by J.K. Rowling

Hectic

Honda

Honoré de Balzac

I Don’t Know How to Say Goodbye to You by Sam Philips

I hate nature

I’m the Man Who Murdered Love by XTC

I.V.

Journalism

Leo Tolstoy (Count Leo)

Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens

Lobster puffs

Martin Luther

Mary Magdalene

Mr. Personality of the New Millennium

Newfangled

New York

Panasonic

Political science

Pregnancy

P.T.A.

Off with their heads

Oprah

Overzealous

Quarters

Rodeo

Romanists

Rome

Rosie

Russia

Sadist

Schindler’s List

Slut

Stars and Stripes Forever by John Philip Sousa

Symphony fundraising committee

Thanksgiving Parade

That chick from the Dukes of Hazzard

The curve

The Goonies

The Hunchback of Notre Dame

The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo

The Shining

The Shining by Stephen King

The View

To the Christian Nobility of the German Nation by Martin Luther

Tofu

Triple caps, easy foam

Tweedy

Valedictorian

Virgin Mary

War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy

William Shakespeare

XTC

XTC, Apple Venus Volume 2




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