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Rory's Bookshelf: The Deer Hunters 1.4

Updated: Jun 10, 2021

Hello and welcome to an extensive list of all things literature. Cue your inner Rory Gilmore, grab your cup of coffee (or tea, whatever. We don't judge here), and sit down, relax, and enjoy.

(if you'd like a complete list accompanied by more lists and reviews and everything in between, check out my Goodreads page).


jump to: an essay on criticism the oxford shakespearesonnet 116the comedy of errorsrichard iiiwho's who and what's what in shakespearesonnet 126sonnet 145kitchen confidential


An Essay on Criticism by Alexander Pope

Max quotes this essay by stating "to err is human." He's basically saying all humans (except Chilton humans, of course) make mistakes. 0 mistakes at Chilton! And since he is their English literature teacher, almost everyone probably knew exactly what this quote was referring to and could most likely recite the entire poem backwards in their sleep. Because... Chilton.



The Oxford Shakespeare by William Shakespeare

One of Rory's study materials. Seen when Rory goes over to Lane's house to study. It is the range of editions of Shakespeare's works produced by Oxford University Press and under the general editorship of Stanley Wells and Gary Taylor. It's basically just a big book of Shakespeare's plays and poems.



Sonnet 116 by William Shakespeare

Que overly-dramatic and beyond competitive Paris inserting herself into Rory's life without hesitation or sincerity. This extremely long quote is from William Shakespeare’s Sonnet 116, first published in 1609, and is one of his most famous love sonnets. She is demonstrating how well she has studied for the test, although only Paris could recite a love poem to someone as a threat. Also, I wonder how long it took her to memorize the script line for this.



The Comedy of Errors by William Shakespeare

Mentioned during Lorelai and Rory's study sesh. This is one of William Shakespeare's early plays. It is his shortest and one of his most farcical comedies, with a major part of the humor coming from slapstick and mistaken identity, in addition to puns and word play. More power to ya, Shakespeare.



Richard III by William Shakespeare

Not the actual dude, but the play. By our one and only Shakespeare. This is another study sesh literature mention (because, duh. She's studying for her lit test, so there's a lot of old English literature references in this episode). It was probably written around 1593. It is labelled a history in the First Folio, and is usually considered one, but it is sometimes called a tragedy, as in the quarto edition.



Who's Who and What's What in Shakespeare: A Complete A to Z Reference Guide with Over 6000 Entries by Evangeline M. O'Connor

Hang on, struggling to regain normal respiratory rates because if that's not the longest name for a book, idk what is. Anyways, this is another one of Rory's study books, because she clearly doesn't have enough material to study already. Ok, but in all honesty though, I probably would have done the same if I was her. The extra little side-notes from outside sources are the true heroes as they give us insight and helpful study tips on these long and monotonous subjects. This book is a quick-reference, handy guide to the plays of Shakespeare that encompasses six thousand entries and covers historical dates and facts, the plots of every play, a profile of every major character, criticism from the most eminent scholars, and a glossary. Currently wishing I had this book during my Shakespeare exam back in high school.



Sonnet 126 by William Shakespeare

Written in 1594, Sonnet 126 is one of 154 sonnets by the English playwright and poet William Shakespeare. It is the final member of the Fair Youth sequence, in which the poet shows how Time and Nature coincide. This one only has 12 lines unlike the others with 14.



Sonnet 145 by William Shakespeare

A *special* sonnet. Tetrameter style. It forms part of the Dark Lady sequence of sonnets and is the only one written not in iambic pentameter, but instead tetrameter. Oh, she fancy, huh?



Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly by Anthony Bourdain

While Rory is studying, Lorelai reads this book. It was first published in August 2000. According to our fav. website, Annotated Gilmore Girls, the book is a humorous behind-the-scenes look at the restaurant industry, both a confessional and a commentary. It provides many hints and tips for the consumer, which may be what drew Lorelai to read it. The book received good reviews and became a best-seller, giving Bourdain a large following and making him a celebrity.



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I appreciate you reading this far. If you're enjoying yourself, feel free to continue onto the next episode. No rules here. This is a fun space.




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